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County's Equine Ordinance; Public Feedback Sought [Blog]

County's Draft Equine Ordinance clarifies difference between “horsekeeping” and “horse stables."

An important milestone in the County’s project of updating the Equine Ordinance will begin the week of Jan. 28. Public feedback on the Draft of the Equine Ordinance and the accompanying Environmental Impact Report is being sought.

You can review the documents on the County’s Equine Ordinance and Information website: http://www.sdcounty.ca.gov/pds/advance/Equine.html 

This update to the Equine Ordinance is long overdue and originally went into effect in 1978.

A few highlights of the draft ordinance are:

  • clarification between those with horses for private use “horsekeeping” and those with horses for commercial use “horse stables”
  • redefining what is a pasture and what is an animal enclosure (setbacks differ)
  • the number of equines permitted per acre; the size and number of barns and agricultural storage buildings allotted
  • and clarification on Farm Employee Housing

The draft ordinance supports the introduction of a tiered permitting system for horse stables similar to the tiered system utilized for wineries. There will be a new permit level, “Zoning Verification,” that is done over the counter at the County offices and will be the least expensive of the horse stable permitting options. Once permits are issued they will stay with the property—after the property is sold. Future owners of the permitted horse stable will not need to reapply.

Carl Stiehl, a member of the County’s department of Advance Planning, has been actively exploring San Diego’s equestrian community to research and solicit feedback on what horsekeeping and horse stables look like and their needs with respect to business viability and zoning. Many equestrian groups and community planning groups have benefited and contributed to this updating process.

In Ramona, the Ramona Trails Association has hosted Carl Stiehl’s Equine Ordinance presentation. I recommend that the Ramona Community Planning Group (RCPG) host a presentation at their next monthly meeting. Considering the economic impact of the equestrian industry on Ramona’s economy, the RCPG should provide a letter of support for this ordinance to the Planning Commission and the Board of Supervisors.

For any questions, please contact Carl Stiehl carl.stiehl@sdcounty.ca.gov

This post is contributed by a community member. The views expressed in this blog are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Patch Media Corporation. Everyone is welcome to submit a post to Patch. If you'd like to post a blog, go here to get started.

Andrea Nodal January 26, 2013 at 12:36 AM
I do not believe what is on my property is anyone's business! They are not paying my bills so get out of my business and mind your own! Less regulation is needed! Let people have their place and their animals too. If they paid more attention to their own business then they nwould not be worried about what I am doing.
Andrea Nodal January 26, 2013 at 12:36 AM
I do not believe what is on my property is anyone's business! They are not paying my bills so get out of my business and mind your own! Less regulation is needed! Let people have their place and their animals too. If they paid more attention to their own business then they nwould not be worried about what I am doing.
HorseLover January 29, 2013 at 08:17 PM
I do not agree with farm housing for employee's. Have all the animals you want, it's your propoerty but when it comes to housing employee's, I do not agree. Predators and people running for the law look for opportunies as such, these are neighborhoods.
salcobb@live.com January 31, 2013 at 09:39 PM
That is fine, but if what you do on your property affects other people, the environment, habitat, neighbors, the public, then it becomes an "impact", which becomes other peoples' business. I learned this in 2003 when Code Enforcement paid me a visit and cited me for boarding TWO horses.
Denise Martinez January 31, 2013 at 09:51 PM
If what you do on your property affects other people, it becomes other peoples' business. We used to live in a beautiful area with rolling hills of beautiful natural vegetation. Then someone bought 40 acres of this beautiful land, removed all of the native vegetation and installed 40 acres of wholesale nursery plants and white "greenhouses". They spray their 40-acres of plants with pesticides that we and other neighbors are downwind of. This operation is creating tremendous impacts. It has reduced the neighborhood's property values, created new health risks, eyesore greenhouses, noise with workers, traffic, and congestion where there was open land. I wish it didn't affect us but it does.
love for all horses February 07, 2013 at 04:31 PM
Andrea Nodal you could have not said it any better AMEN........ "I do not believe what is on my property is anyone's business! They are not paying my bills so get out of my business and mind your own! Less regulation is needed! Let people have their place and their animals too. If they paid more attention to their own business then they nwould not be worried about what I am doing." Where we live we mind our own business don't bug anyone, but we have a lady on the hill that is out of control. She has made claims that she want this to be "Rancho Santa Fe East" well lady you and your husbend the puppet go back to where you are from we don't want you and if you choose to stay. STAY OUT OF ALL YOUR NEIGHBORS BUSINESS you and your puppet are creepy and you scare our childern. Oh and I heard you meet your match they have more money then you so someone finally give you a run for your money literally..

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